Virtual tour

In Spanish Golden Age households, there was no space exclusively set aside as a dining room, but instead, tables were arranged in the areas where conversation took place, and were then removed once the meal was over. The basic utensil was the spoon, but they ate almost all types of food using their fingers, and as a result, in noble households, after the dessert course was served, the servants came in...

The renovation of the cavern or old cellar allows this space to be regained for public use. It now serves to house the exhibition of an audiovisual presentation on the life of Miguel de Cervantes, with a program combining screen projections and scenographic components. #gallery-3 { margin: auto; } #gallery-3 .gallery-item { float: left; margin-top: 10px; text-align: center; width: 100%; } #gallery-3 img { border: 2px solid #cfcfcf; } #gallery-3 .gallery-caption { margin-left: 0; } /* see gallery_shortcode() in wp-includes/media.php */ Sala de audiovisual VIRTUAL TOUR ...

Ladies' Parlour (estrado de damas) is a room highly illustrative of Spanish daily life, where the ladies sat on cushions Moorish style (a la morisca), to read, play music, do needlework, pray or talk. The term estrado refers to an Oriental style of decorating, where both floors and walls were covered, and the preferred seating position was Turkish fashion, with legs crossed, or reclining on rugs and large cushions. From the 14th century...

Cervantes' father, Rodrigo, was a surgeon-physician médico zurujano, an occupation somewhere between physician and barber. Unlike barbers, the zurujanos had academic training and knowledge of anatomy and medicine, which is why they performed the more complex procedures. Barbers, little more than folk healers, concentrated for the most part on wound-dressing and bloodletting. The physician ranked on a comparably higher level; his superior social status and training afforded him a larger...

The museum is divided between two floors, and its focal point is a central courtyard, a typical feature of dwellings in Alcalá de Henares, and a legacy of Roman and Islamic building traditions. Eight granite and limestone columns with Corinthian capitals form the lower gallery portico, while the upper gallery is supported by wooden posts and enclosed by a banister of the same material. Prior to the 1956 restoration, the...

Skip to content